FAO Quotables

"But being right, even morally right, isn't everything. It is also important to be competent, to be consistent, and to be knowledgeable. It's important for your soldiers and diplomats to speak the language of the people you want to influence. It's important to understand the ethnic and tribal divisions of the place you hope to assist."
-Anne Applebaum

Friday, August 10, 2012

Words of Wisdom: 101 Tips from the World's Most Famous Authors » Online College Search - Your Accredited Online Degree Directory

Words of Wisdom: 101 Tips from the World's Most Famous Authors » Online College Search - Your Accredited Online Degree Directory

The first few are below:


  1. Ernest Hemingway. Use short sentences and short first paragraphs. These rules were two of four given to Hemingway in his early days as a reporter–and words he lived by.
  2. Mark Twain. Substitute "damn" every time you want to use the word "very." Twain's thought was that your editor would delete the "damn," and leave the writing as it should be. The short version: eliminate using the word "very."
  3. Oscar Wilde. Be unpredictable. Wilde suggested that "consistency is the last refuge of the unimaginative."
  4. Anton Chekhov. Show, don't tell. This advice comes out of most every writing class taught. Chekhov said it most clearly when he said, "Don't tell me the moon is shining; show me the glint of light on broken glass."

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